Transporting gas cylinders

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  1. #1
    Hi Skidmark,
    I have a question. I have been working in the compressed gas / welding supply industry for over 23 years with a major multi national. Over the years we have taught, published, paid lots of $$$$$!!!! in the interest of safety with regard to the use and transportation of our products, in particular compressed gas cylinders.
    Yet, weather I am in Vancouver or St, John's or anywhere in between, I still see guys happily driving to work / job site with a set of cylinders in the back of a pick up truck, not safely secured in place (bungie cord), and with either no safety caps in place or the regulators still on the valves.
    I have often considered how ironic it would be as I am on the way to host yet another safety seminar, some lounge lizard T-Bones this guy in the pick up truck and the cylinders come out of the box, break the valve off for sure, and come straight for me.
    It is illeagal to transport cylinders in this manner. Why does it seem it is never inforced? Our company is regularly inspected by TDG inspectors and our equipment is designed specifically for this job, yet the guy in the pick up with the bungie cords keeps on going.

    Thanks,
    Air Squid

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  3. #2
    Registered User
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    I used to haul your competitions bottles (Praxair) for a gravel mine I used to lay the oxygen bottles down flat on the truck deck and strap them down. I was only carrying 10 large oxy(green) bottles I laid the large acetylene bottle flat I know they are not suppose to but I only carried 3 of them.

    I tried carrying them in the cage but they clanged and banged as you drove down the road you could feel it shake the truck around. Also when you drove down the road the wind would blow through the bottles and through the two holes in the caps of the bottles you would get a whistling sound.

    It wasn't legal for me to haul them the pit was getting flack from a trucking company that I was hauling them illegally. Fine with me hauling the bottles was a pain in the azz I didn't make money doing it.

    I do have a level 3 DG ticket but I don't plan on getting placards and crap for my truck I don't want to haul DG goods. I have it because I work for ferries plus I work with service trucks so you need it.

    To legally carry a set of torches in your truck they have to be fixed in the upright position so they don't go anywhere bungee cords don't cound. The bottles have to be held in place with a chain and bolt to tighten the chain or steel straps around the bottles.

    When driving down the road the regulators are suppose to be removed and the caps installed. The driver of the truck has to hold a level 2 DG ticket along with paper work for bottles carried on a service truck.

    Oxygen bottles are pretty safe when you have the caps on they are like torpedos if they fall over and the valve knocks off

    I have dropped a few large oxy bottles on the ground with the caps on you roll them off the deck of the truck (1 ton).

    The Praxair accet botles are heavy as h*ll its the big black ones with the ring around the top and exposed vavle.

    The Canox bottles are easier to handle because they are smaller bottles.

  4. #3
    Registered User
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    Laying the bottles down isn't really good for them especially the acetylene because the acetone that is used in the bottles can leak out.

    If you have a torch cart it should be strapped up right it all depends on how big your bottles are if you have mini bottles I wouldn't worry about it too much.

    Fullsize bottles have to have more care and attention to make sure they are strapped up right.

    If you are traveling long distances with the bottles you may have troubles but if your only going a few blocks I wouldn't worry.

  5. #4
    Twit
    Join Date
    May 2003
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    Castlegar, BC
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    Originally posted by Hayes
    Laying the bottles down isn't really good for them especially the acetylene because the acetone that is used in the bottles can leak out.
    You are right that laying down Acetylene bottles isn't great, but I believe it's ok for transport. The valve shouldn't be opened for a certain period of time after standing upright (1/2hour?) otherwise more then just the acetylene will come out - acetone I think? Which is used to keep the acetylene from becoming unstable under pressure. There's a more technical explanation for it, but it's been a long time since I took my apprenticeship!

  6. #5
    Hi Guys,

    The law /regulation applies to everyone not just commercial vehicles. The TDG regs are based on the total volume of gas being transported as to weather you need placards etc. Cylinders should never be transported laying down. Acetylene laid down causes the acetone solvent inside the cylinder to settle on the half of the cylinder. So when you use it the acetone will come out and this usually strips any seal o rings hoses that you have in your system.

    You should always transport cylinders (large or small) in the upright position with a safety cap in place. The few exceptions are small plumbers acetylene cylinders, some of which don't use caps, (probably soon to be gone), and an enclosed welding / service truck cabinet specifically designed to carry cylinders which provides adequate ventilation, and some small Medical Oxygen cylinders in ambulances.

    While I am not the TDG reg expert, one o these days when I am back in Vancouver, I'll propose a safety seminar to Lars & Wil.

    Air Squid



    P.S. Transported upright with safety cap in place reffers to being transported in a vehicle like a pick up, NOT in the closed space of a car or mini van where the is no ventilation.

  7. #6
    Superfly lars's Avatar
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    Note: I split this thread off from another thread since this was definitely going off on a tangent.

    ...lars
    Too Much Driver For Car

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